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Rare Plants
Rare Plants
Rare Plants
The Division of Natural Areas and Preserves determines the list of Ohio endangered and threatened plants every 2 years.

OVERVIEW

The first status list, issued in 1980, was largely based on preliminary lists of rare plant species compiled in the 1970s for the Ohio Biological Survey. Since 1980, the status lists have been updated biennially. This list became effective on December 31, 2018, and will be revised again in autumn 2020. The list contains the following groups: Lichens, Bryophytes (mosses, liverworts, hornworts), Lycophytes (club-moss, spike-moss, quillwort), Pteridophytes (ferns), Gymnosperms, Dicotyledons, and Monocotyledons.

The current list contains 84 presumed extirpated, 256 endangered, 158 threatened, and 106 potentially threatened taxa, plus 4 taxa with no assigned status. Only data from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2017, were considered in assigning endangerment status based upon information in the Ohio Natural Heritage Database. There are Six Ohio plants are also included on the federal list of endangered and threatened species. Running buffalo clover (Trifolium stoloniferum) is federally endangered. Northern monkshood (Aconitum noveboracense), Lakeside daisy (Tetraneuris herbacea), small whorled pogonia (Isotria medeoloides), prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera leucophaea), and Virginia spiraea (Spiraea virginiana) are federally threatened.

In addition to studies completed by our botanists, we rely heavily on volunteers, conservation organizations, state and federal agencies, and environmental consultants to track the status of rare plant populations. Please contact the Division of Natural Areas and Preserves if you have questions or information concerning these species at 614-265-6419.

2018-19 Rare Native Ohio Plants Status List

STATUS DESIGNATION CRITERIA

Endangered Species
A native Ohio plant species may be designated endangered if, based on its known status in Ohio, one or more of the following criteria apply.

  1. The species is a federal endangered species extant in Ohio.
  2. The natural populations of the species in Ohio are limited to three or fewer occurrences.
  3. The distribution of the natural populations of the species in Ohio is limited to a geographic area delineated by three or fewer U.S. Geological Survey 7.5 minute quadrangle maps.
  4. The number of plants in all the natural populations of the species in Ohio is limited to one hundred or fewer individual, physically unconnected plants.

Threatened Species
A native Ohio plant species may be designated threatened if, based on its known status in Ohio, one or more of the following criteria apply:

  1. The species is a federally threatened species extant in Ohio but not on the state endangered species list.
  2. The natural populations of the species in Ohio are limited to no less than four or more than 10 occurrences.
  3. The distribution of the natural populations of the species in Ohio is limited to a geographic area delineated by no less than four or more than seven U.S. Geological Survey 7.5 minute quadrangle maps.

Presumed Extirpated Species
A native Ohio plant species may be designated presumed extirpated when no natural populations of the species have been documented since 1998.

Potentially Threatened Species
A native Ohio plant species may be designated potentially threatened if one or more of the following criteria apply:

  1. The species is extant in Ohio and does not qualify as a state endangered or threatened species, but it is a proposed federal endangered or threatened species or a species listed in the Federal Register as under review for such proposal.
  2. The natural populations of the species are imperiled to the extent that the species could conceivably become a threatened species in Ohio within the forseeable future.
  3. The natural populations of the species, even though they are not threatened in Ohio at the time of designation, are believed to be declining in abundance or vitality at a significant rate throughout all or large portions of the state.