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Adams Lake State Park

Located in Ohio's Bluegrass region one of the state's most scenic and interesting areas — Adams Lake State Park has much to offer the nature enthusiast. Remnant prairies and a quiet lake can be enjoyed in this small but unique 50-acre park.

Activities

Boating

Only hand-powered craft and those with electric motors are permitted on the lake. One small launch ramp near the park entrance provides access to the 47-acre lake.

Fishing

Anglers will enjoy nice catches of largemouth bass, bluegill, rainbow trout, channel catfish, bullhead, and carp.

Hunting

Two waterfowl hunting blinds are issued each season in a controlled hunt managed by Ohio Division of Wildlife.

Download the Hunting Map

Picnicking

Four picnic areas with tables and restrooms are located throughout the park. Please bring trash bags with you, as all picnic areas are "Carry In, Carry Out". No trash cans are provided.

Playgrounds

Playground facilities are located in a few areas.

Trails

An accessible 3/4-mile walking path follows the southern shore of the lake. Additional trails are found on the adjacent Adams Lake Prairie State Nature Preserve. Due to the botanical uniqueness of this area, visitors are not permitted to wander from the established trails.

History & Natural Features

History

The Adams Lake region was once inhabited by prehistoric and mound building cultures, most notably the Adenas and Hopewell. Internationally renowned Serpent Mound, the hallmark of the Adena culture (1000 B.C.-100 A.D.), remains a mystery in regard to its origin and purpose. The historic site can be found north of the park near Locust Grove off State Route 41. The shorter lived Hopewell culture (100 B.C.-600 A.D.) created Tremper Mound, located along State Route 104 in adjacent Scioto County. Effigy pipes, which were fashioned in stylized images of native animals were discovered in great numbers.In more recent history, the powerful Shawnee Nation controlled this area until trappers and traders seized upon its abundance of furbearers. Pioneers followed in vast numbers as the permanent settlement of the Northwest Territory continued. Adams County was one of the original four counties of this huge district at Temper Mound.

The shorter-lived Hopewell culture (100 B.C.-600 A.D.) created Tremper Mound, located along State Route 104 in adjacent Scioto County. Here, effigy pipes which were fashioned in stylized images of native animals were discovered in great numbers.

In more recent history, the powerful Shawnee Nation controlled this area until trappers and traders seized upon its abundance of furbearers. Pioneers followed in vast numbers as the permanent settlement of the Northwest Territory continued. Adams County was one of the original four counties of this huge district.

Adams Lake was originally constructed to provide drinking water for the village of West Union. After an alternative county water system was developed, the state purchased the lake and surrounding land in 1950.

Natural Features

Adams Lake State Park lies in an area rich in natural diversity with many unique plants and animals. Wedged between the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains to the east and the glaciated land to the north and west, no other area of Ohio boasts a richer abundance of plant species.

Known as the Bluegrass Region of Ohio, Adams County harbors scattered pockets of prairie communities, a remnant of the past when the great western prairies reached into Ohio. Sometime after the last glacial advance, the climate turned warmer and drier. It was during such periods that the prairie advanced eastward into Ohio. Purple coneflower, little blue stem and prairie dock provide an impressive display during the peak blooming season of mid-summer.

The glaciers that covered most of Ohio did not reach Adams County, but their effect is still evident. As the glaciers advanced and the climate changed, many northern species of plants expanded their range southward and remained after the glaciers retreated. White cedar and maidenhair fern represent two such northern transplants.

Before the glaciers advanced, a great river called the Teays flowed through Ohio. As the glaciers moved forward, they had a profound effect on the drainage system by blocking existing rivers. The ancient Teays River was blocked and its waters were backed up forming the Ohio River. The Teays River transported plants native to more southern conditions to Adams County. Mountain laurel is one such traveler still found in the area.

Once teeming with elk, buffalo and bear, the region now hosts numerous songbirds as well as white-tailed deer, turkey, gray squirrel and other mammals.

Emergencies

Call: 911

Phone Number

(937) 393-4284

Non-Emergency

#ODNR

Natural Features

    Available Trails

      Activities